HISTORICAL NOTE: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the Vietnam War and a revolution of values

On April 4, 1967, Dr. King delivered a speech to religious leaders in the Riverside Church, New York City, which linked his civil rights work and non-violence movement with the tragic war in Vietnam. Dr. King outlined the history and the politics of the beginning of the war. He called on US leaders to end the war, suggesting five concrete steps to achieve the peace. He also called for a spiritual revolution of values. The Vietnam War continued for eight more years, through King’s assassination a year after the speech, and did not end until 1975.

Martin Luther King, Jr.: Beyond Vietnam — A Time to Break Silence
[Text] http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkatimetobreaksilence.htm

[On speaking out] “I knew that I could never again raise my voice against the violence of the oppressed in the ghettos without having first spoken clearly to the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today — my own government. For the sake of those boys, for the sake of this government, for the sake of the hundreds of thousands trembling under our violence, I cannot be silent. ”

[On war and poverty] “We have been repeatedly faced with the cruel irony of watching Negro and white boys on TV screens as they kill and die together for a nation that has been unable to seat them together in the same schools. And so we watch them in brutal solidarity burning the huts of a poor village, but we realize that they would hardly live on the same block in Chicago. I could not be silent in the face of such cruel manipulation of the poor.”

[On empathy] “Here is the true meaning and value of compassion and nonviolence, when it helps us to see the enemy’s point of view, to hear his questions, to know his assessment of ourselves. For from his view we may indeed see the basic weaknesses of our own condition, and if we are mature, we may learn and grow and profit from the wisdom of the brothers who are called the opposition.”

[On American soldiers] “I am as deeply concerned about our own troops there as anything else. For it occurs to me that what we are submitting them to in Vietnam is not simply the brutalizing process that goes on in any war where armies face each other and seek to destroy. We are adding cynicism to the process of death, for they must know after a short period there that none of the things we claim to be fighting for are really involved. Before long they must know that their government has sent them into a struggle among Vietnamese, and the more sophisticated surely realize that we are on the side of the wealthy, and the secure, while we create a hell for the poor.”

[On revolution of values ] “I am convinced that if we are to get on the right side of the world revolution, we as a nation must undergo a radical revolution of values. We must rapidly begin the shift from a thing-oriented society to a person-oriented society. When machines and computers, profit motives and property rights, are considered more important than people, the giant triplets of racism, extreme materialism, and militarism are incapable of being conquered. ”


Photo: Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial

Credit: Ken Kistler

 

One Comment Add yours

  1. joeelia says:

    Thank you for reminding us that great leaders aren’t always elected. King was a great one. The country needs his like again.

    Like

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